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Only half of youths involved in problem behaviors graduate on time

Children who experience high rates of bullying, fighting or absenteeism during seventh grade are at significantly greater risk of not graduating high school on time, a new University of Illinois study suggests.

Does revoking professional licenses prompt borrowers to repay student loans?

Even though several states have these regulations on the books, they’re really a last resort for collecting student loan debt, says Professor Angela Lyons

Does revoking professional licenses prompt borrowers to repay student loans?

Even though several states have these regulations on the books, they’re really a last resort for collecting student loan debt, says Professor Angela Lyons

Does tax reform bill spell trouble for higher education?

Higher education finance expert Jennifer Delaney talks about the possible ramifications for college students and their families of tax reform proposals being considered by the U.S. Senate 

Education Justice Project receives $1 million Mellon grant

The Education Justice Project at the University of Illinois is expanding its academic programs for men in prison with the support of a three-year, $1 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Expert on pre-language communication to give annual Goldstick Lecture

Nancy C. Brady, an expert on pre-language communication and language development in young children, will give the annual Goldstick Family Lecture in the Study of Communication Disorders at the University of Illinois.

Pay-it-forward college financing policies examined in new study

Pay-it-forward college financing programs that enable students to pay tuition upon departure rather than entry may make college more accessible to greater numbers of students in the U.S., a new analysis suggests.

Is affirmative action in college admissions under threat?

An Illinois expert on affirmative action in higher education talks about the Justice Department’s plans to investigate possible racial discrimination in college and university admissions policies

Taboo words’ impact mediated by context, listeners’ likelihood of being offended

A new paper by University of Illinois scholars suggests that the physiological and psychological effects of profanity and other taboo words on people who read or hear them may be due largely – but not entirely – to the context and individual audience members’ likelihood of being offended.

Culture’s influence on testing, evaluation to be focus of conference

Culture’s pivotal role in effective educational and social assessments – and how related research findings can spark social change – will be the focus of an international conference in Chicago this fall.

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