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Social Sciences

Respect Indigenous ancestors: Scholars urge community engagement before research

A new article in the journal Science provides guidance for those intending to study ancient human remains in the Americas. The paper, written by Indigenous scholars and scientists and those who collaborate with Indigenous communities on studies of ancient DNA, offers a clear directive to others contemplating such research: First, do no harm.

Professor chronicles how Big Ten brought order to college football, then lost its way

U. of I. historian Winton Solberg tells the story of the Big Ten’s first half-century, focusing on the organizers and issues rather than on-the-field action.

Study: Girls more likely than boys to struggle with social, behavioral, academic needs

The more failing grades students have during eighth grade, the more likely they are to experience social-emotional learning problems, academic difficulties and behavioral problems as high school freshmen, a new study found.

 

Is autism a disorder, an identity or both?

Speech and hearing science professor Laura DeThorne and doctoral students Henry Angulo and Veronica Vidal discuss how the neurodiversity movement recognizes autistic individuals’ unique experiences, skills and strengths, and resists the medicalization of autism.

Professor makes legal case for schools to challenge cyberbullies

Schools have a limited ability to challenge cyberbullies, but an Illinois professor has made a legal study on how to change that.

Could a citizenship question alter the 2020 census results?

A citizenship question on the 2020 census could add to existing undercounts, says an Illinois professor who serves on a Census Bureau advisory committee

Optimistic Latinos have healthier hearts, study finds

Latinos who are the most optimistic are more likely to have healthy hearts, according to a new study of more than 4,900 Latinos in the U.S. led by University of Illinois social work professor Rosalba Hernandez.

Gender differences in vocational interests decrease with age, study finds

Gender differences in vocational interests increase drastically during puberty but tend to decrease across the lifespan, researchers at the University of Illinois found in a new study.

Emotional suppression reduces memory of negative events

By peering at the brains of study subjects prompted to suppress negative emotions, scientists have gained new insights into how emotional regulation influences negative feelings and memories. They hope the findings will lead to new methods to combat depression.

Job of a Congress member not one size fits all, authors find

The job of a Congress member is not one size fits all, say two U. of I. political scientists. In fact, there are five "legislative styles."

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