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Paper: Don’t rely on mixed messages to change health behaviors

Self-improvement messages to lose weight, quit smoking or eat more fruits and vegetables can fall on deaf ears if the intervention message is mixed, says new research from U. of I. psychology professor Dolores Albarracin.

Click beetles inspire design of self-righting robots

Robots perform many tasks that humans can’t or don’t want to perform, getting around on intricately designed wheels and limbs. If they tip over, however, they are rendered almost useless. A team of University of Illinois mechanical engineers and entomologists are looking to click beetles, who can right themselves without the use of their legs, to solve this robotics challenge.

Nutrition has benefits for brain network organization, new research finds

A new study found that monounsaturated fatty acids are linked to general intelligence and the organization of the brain’s attention network.

Study: Biomarkers as predictive of sepsis as lengthy patient monitoring

One measurement of key biomarkers in blood that characterize sepsis can give physicians as much information as hours of monitoring symptoms, a new study found.

Scientists discover spring-loaded mechanism in unusual species of trap-jaw ant

Research reveals how a group of trap-jaw ants can snap their jaws shut at speeds of up to 50 miles per hour – just fast enough to capture their elusive prey.

Ringing in ears keeps brain more at attention, less at rest, study finds

Tinnitus, a chronic ringing or buzzing in the ears, has eluded medical treatment and scientific understanding. A new study by University of Illinois researchers found that chronic tinnitus is associated with changes in certain networks in the brain, and furthermore, those changes cause the brain to stay more at attention and less at rest.

Study links fish stress hormones to whether they take the bait

Take a fish out of water and its stress hormones will go up. Adrenaline and noradrenaline, the “fight or flight” hormones, peak first, followed more gradually by cortisol. A new study finds that largemouth bass whose cortisol levels rise most after a brief bout of stress are inherently harder to catch by angling.

Paper: Clinical signs best predictors of mortality in critically ill calves

Clinical signs may be better predictors of mortality in neonatal calves with diarrhea than blood pH levels and other laboratory findings, suggests a new study co-written by University of Illinois researcher Peter D. Constable.

Slowing dangerous bacteria may be more effective than killing them, researchers report

A new study suggests it may be possible to slow dangerous infections by manipulating the messages microbes send to one another, allowing the body to defeat an infection without causing the bacteria to develop resistance to the treatment.

Increased risk of suicide, mental health conditions linked to sexual assault victimization

An analysis of nearly 200 independent studies involving more than 230,000 adult participants finds that having been sexually assaulted is associated with significantly increased risk of anxiety, depression, suicidality, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, obsessive-compulsive disorder and bipolar disorder.

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