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Study explores the down side of being dubbed ‘class clown’

By the time boys who are dubbed class clowns reach third grade, they plummet to the bottom of the social circle -- and view themselves as social failures -- as classmates’ disapproval of their behavior grows, a new study found.

Study: Girls more likely than boys to struggle with social, behavioral, academic needs

The more failing grades students have during eighth grade, the more likely they are to experience social-emotional learning problems, academic difficulties and behavioral problems as high school freshmen, a new study found.

 

Laser light show machine teaches students math, computer programming

Laser light shows are no longer just the stage dressing for rock concerts. They’re also a fun way for local middle school students to learn the fundamentals of mathematics from educators and scientists at the University of Illinois.

Professor makes legal case for schools to challenge cyberbullies

Schools have a limited ability to challenge cyberbullies, but an Illinois professor has made a legal study on how to change that.

Gender differences in vocational interests decrease with age, study finds

Gender differences in vocational interests increase drastically during puberty but tend to decrease across the lifespan, researchers at the University of Illinois found in a new study.

Is the tide of sexual misconduct allegations shifting the balance of power?

News reports, social media campaigns such as #MeToo are raising awareness of sexual misconduct and helping survivors find their voices, says educational psychologist Anita Hund

Paper: Videos help medical students master physiology concepts

Researchers at the University of Illinois College of Medicine and Carle Illinois College of Medicine have found that creating short videos that explain information presented during physiology lectures makes teaching easier for medical educators and learning easier for their students.

Study links responsible behavior in high school to life success 50 years later

A new study links doing one’s homework, being interested and behaving responsibly in high school to better academic and career success as many as 50 years later. This effect, reported in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, holds true even after accounting for parental income, IQ and other factors known to influence achievement, researchers report.

Study: Many parents of children with disabilities don’t make care plans

Fewer than half of parents of children with disabilities make long-term care plans to ensure their child's needs are met if the parent dies or can no longer care for the child, University of Illinois special education professor Meghan Burke found.

Key to willpower lies in believing you have it in abundance

Americans believe they have less stamina for strenuous mental activity than their European counterparts -- an indication that people in the U.S. perceive their willpower or self-control as being in limited supply, suggests a new study led by a researcher at the University of Illinois.

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