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Instructions for Rendering Carcasses

Instructions for Rendering Carcasses

The following is a list of unacceptable species and materials for rendering carcasses with National By-Products, Inc.

Unacceptable Species

All animal species shall be accepted EXCEPT:

  • Adult sheep and goats
  • Dogs and cats
  • Deer or elk tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).
  • Deer or elk originating from endemic areas or eradication zones for CWD as specified by the Department of Natural Resources, unless they have been tested negative for CWD.
  • Cattle tested positive for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE).
  • Animals inoculated with infectious agents.
  • Transgenic animals, potentially transgenic animals, "no-takes" in the production of transgenic animals, and off-spring of transgenic animals.
  • Small research animals (e.g., rabbits, rats, mice, birds, etc.)
  • Human tissues and organs.

Unacceptable Materials

Any carcass or animal part being rendered shall not contain levels of the following in excess of those approved by the Food and Drug Administration for Food Animals:

  • Insecticides
  • Herbicides
  • Fungicides
  • Rodenticides
  • Polychlorinated biphenyls
  • Polybrominated biphenyls
  • Heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, selenium.
  • Livestock in which chromium oxide has been used as a non-digestible dye for nutrition studies are acceptable.

Rendering chemically-euthanized animals

Agents that result in tissue residues cannot be used for euthanasia of animals intended for human or animal food (e.g. red meat) unless those agents are approved by the FDA. Carbon dioxide is the only chemical currently approved for euthanasia of food animals that does not lead to tissue residues. Animals sent to National By-Products, Inc. are not rendered for red meat, only for protein. National By-Products does not prohibit pentobarbital use for animals rendered for protein.

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